Payne Hicks Beach

Payne Hicks Beach

Anglo French Family Law

"Payne Hicks Beach are arguably the strongest family law firm in the country, providing enviable strength in depth in both financial and private children law areas" Chambers UK

"The best legal team money can buy. Unbelievably thorough, first-class litigators, highly respected in the field. Supremely well connected internationally and ideally placed to help in cases involving multi-jurisdictional issues"The Legal 500 UK

Droit de la famille anglo-français

"Payne Hicks Beach est sans doute le cabinet de droit de la famille le plus solide du pays, offrant une force enviable dans les domaines du droit financier et du droit privé des enfants".
Chambers UK

"La meilleure équipe juridique que l'on puisse acheter. Des plaideurs de première classe, incroyablement minutieux, très respectés dans leur domaine. Extrêmement bien connectés au niveau international et idéalement placés pour aider dans les affaires impliquant des questions multi-juridictionnelles". 
The Legal 500 UK

We frequently deal with international aspects of family law and have significant experience advising Anglo French couples, French couples living in England or those with connections or assets in Francophone countries. We offer dual Anglo/French speaking services on all areas such as divorce, financial provision, children, pre and post nuptial agreements, cohabitation and surrogacy. We have also developed a strong network of experts from the legal, business and financial sectors in Francophone countries.

We understand that multi jurisdiction cases can be complex. We therefore work with our clients to customise a strategy which best suits their needs.

If you would like any advice on these areas, please contact Emilie Helm, a dual French and English national and specialist French Anglo family lawyer.

We also provide Private Client and Property solutions for French Nationals.

For further information on our Private Client Solutions for French Nationals, please click here or on our Property Solutions, please click here

Nous traitons fréquemment des aspects internationaux du droit de la famille et avons une expérience significative dans le conseil aux couples anglo-français, aux couples français vivant en Angleterre ou à ceux qui ont des liens ou des actifs dans les pays francophones. Nous offrons des services bilingues anglais/français dans tous les domaines tels que le divorce, les dispositions financières, les enfants, les accords pré et postnuptiaux, la cohabitation et la maternité de substitution. Nous avons également développé un solide réseau d'experts des secteurs juridique, commercial et financier dans les pays francophones.

Nous comprenons que les affaires multi juridictionnelles peuvent être complexes. C'est pourquoi nous travaillons avec nos clients pour élaborer une stratégie adaptée à leurs besoins.

Si vous souhaitez obtenir des conseils dans ces domaines, veuillez contacter Emilie Helm, qui possède la double nationalité française et anglaise et est spécialisée dans le droit de la famille franco-anglaise.

Nous proposons également des solutions en matière de clientèle privée et de propriété pour les ressortissants français.

Pour de plus amples informations sur nos solutions pour les clients privés de nationalité française, veuillez cliquer ici ou sur nos solutions immobilières, veuillez cliquer ici.

Nous traitons fréquemment des aspects internationaux du droit de la famille et avons une expérience significative dans le conseil aux couples anglo-français, aux couples français vivant en Angleterre ou à ceux qui ont des liens ou des actifs dans les pays francophones. Nous offrons des services bilingues anglais/français dans tous les domaines tels que le divorce, les dispositions financières, les enfants, les accords pré et postnuptiaux, la cohabitation et la maternité de substitution. Nous avons également développé un solide réseau d'experts des secteurs juridique, commercial et financier dans les pays francophones.

Nous comprenons que les affaires multi juridictionnelles peuvent être complexes. C'est pourquoi nous travaillons avec nos clients pour élaborer une stratégie adaptée à leurs besoins.

Si vous souhaitez obtenir des conseils dans ces domaines, veuillez contacter Emilie Helm, qui possède la double nationalité française et anglaise et est spécialisée dans le droit de la famille franco-anglaise.

Nous proposons également des solutions en matière de clientèle privée et de propriété pour les ressortissants français.

Pour de plus amples informations sur nos solutions pour les clients privés de nationalité française, veuillez cliquer ici ou sur nos solutions immobilières, veuillez cliquer ici.

PRACTITIONERS IN THIS FIELD

LATEST POSTS

Podcast

Partons de zéro

Partons de zéro - an Anglo French Family Law podcast by Emilie Helm, a dual French and ...

Anglo French Family Law: Your questions answered

  • Where should I divorce?
    • French married couples or married individuals (for example a French lady married to an Englishman) who are habitually resident in England for the required period of time will be able to divorce in this jurisdiction. However, there may also be an option to divorce in France dependent on the circumstances. It is therefore vital to seek legal advice as soon as possible if you are contemplating divorce so that you can consider the following:

      • In which country can I divorce?
      • If I can divorce in both England and France, what are the advantages and disadvantages of divorcing in one country over the other?
      • Will my Court Order be recognised and enforceable in the other jurisdiction?

       

      In addition to this there will be other important factors to consider such as the differences in the respective procedures, whether there are nuptial agreements or marital contracts to take into account, the likely costs and duration of each procedure in each country. As previously stated, it is important to seek advice early on in the process so that you can make choices which are right for you.

  • Do the English and French courts take the same approach when dividing assets?
    • No, it is very different.

      In France, the very act of marriage creates a property regime. Couples must elect a matrimonial property regime to govern their assets and, if they fail to do so, a default regime will be imposed upon them. The elected property regime is recorded in a French marital contract which is usually prepared and signed before a  notary who acts for both parties. These property regimes provide a structure for the organisation and division of a couple’s assets. They set out how the assets should be treated on a divorce, as well as in circumstances of insolvency or death. Couples therefore know how their assets will be treated on divorce in France, effectively from the date of their marriage.

      In contrast, England, operates a discretionary system. A judge has to take into account all of the circumstances of the case and the first consideration is given to the welfare of any children of the family under the age of 18. The overall objective of the Judge is to achieve a fair outcome. Fairness is determined by three principles known as “needs, sharing and compensation”. Whilst a couple may have entered into a nuptial agreement (which we cover below) they are often not binding and do not dictate the outcome upon divorce.

      As such, in England, no two cases are the same and the outcome will very much depend on the particular facts of each case.

  • Are English nuptial agreements similar to French marital contracts?
    • The content of a French marital contract tends to be very different from an English Nuptial Agreement which is tailored to the specific requirements of the parties and can deal with issues such as the division of capital and payment of maintenance. A French marital contract can only deal with the former (division of capital).

      Further, in England, foreign marital contracts and English nuptial agreements are not legally enforceable or automatically binding. However, the Supreme Court formulated a three part test in the landmark case of Radmacher and Granatino as follows:

      “The Court should give effect to a nuptial agreement that is freely entered into by each party with a full appreciation of its implications unless in the circumstances prevailing it would not be fair to hold the parties to their agreement.”

      In practice, this means that any couple entering into a nuptial agreement in England should adhere to the following guidelines:

      • Ensure that there is no duress, or unconscionable pressure or significant imbalance in negotiating power;
      • Ensure that each party has all of the information which is material to his or her decision to sign the agreement. The presence of financial disclosure and independent legal advice tend to be persuasive that this has been achieved but is not always necessary;
      • Ensure the agreement is fair.  There are many different strands to the concept of fairness but, in summary, the agreement must not leave one party in a predicament of real need whilst the other enjoys a sufficiency or more.

       

      Most importantly, it is not possible to oust the jurisdiction of the English Court, which retains its discretion to uphold or reject a nuptial agreement. However, if these safeguards are met, then the couple should expect to be held to the terms of their agreement.

  • Will England recognise and uphold a French marital contract?
    • No, not automatically. As previously stated, it is not possible to oust the jurisdiction of the Court.

      In the past, English courts have been cautious about the weight that they are willing to give to foreign marital contracts in general and not just those which are French. The reason is that these agreements tend to be much less formal than English prenuptial agreements. Most couples enter into them in the days preceding the wedding, without taking independent legal advice and often without seeing any disclosure.  

      However, the recent case of Versteegh v Versteegh [2018] has made it easier for foreign marital contracts to be upheld in England as the Court recognises that these informalities are commonplace. In other words, if the procedural standards which apply to the country in which the agreement is drafted are met then it is arguable that the agreement should be upheld i.e. the lack of formality does not automatically mean that either party misunderstood the implications of the agreement. That said, it is still important that those wishing to rely upon a foreign marital agreement show that both parties fully understood the implications of entering into the agreement and that each had all of the information material to their decision. In those circumstances,  the court is likely to give effect to the agreement unless it would lead to unfairness.

      Ultimately, each case will very much depend upon its own particular facts and so there can never be any guarantees that a simple French marital contract will be enforced in England as it would in France in the context of a divorce. It is also important to note that the English court will always apply English law and not French law to the division of capital and payment of maintenance.

  • What happens if my partner wants to remain living in England but I want to return to France with the children?
    • On the assumption that both parents have parental responsibility for the children, it will only be possible for you and the children to move to France to live if the other parent consents in writing. If the other parent does not consent, then you will need to seek an order from the English Court for permission to relocate with your child.  Not doing so would result in any removal from the jurisdiction being considered to be child abduction.

      These types of application are often hugely stressful for both parents. One parent may be worried that the distance created by living in two different countries will result in less contact with their child and by default a less meaningful relationship. The other parent may feel worried that they will be forced to remain living in a country where they no longer want to be. It is therefore very important to seek advice and consider carefully whether such a move would genuinely be in the child’s best interests, and if so, be able to demonstrate and evidence those benefits. Care also needs to be taken to show that you will be able to support and facilitate a meaningful relationship between the parent who remains living in England and the child. It is therefore vital to seek advice early on if you are considering such a move.

Droit de la famille anglo-français : Les réponses à vos questions

  • Où dois-je divorcer ?
    • Les couples mariés français ou les personnes mariées (par exemple, une Française mariée à un Anglais) qui ont leur résidence habituelle en Angleterre pendant la période requise pourront divorcer dans cette juridiction. Toutefois, il peut également être possible de divorcer en France, en fonction des circonstances. Il est donc essentiel de demander un conseil juridique dès que possible si vous envisagez de divorcer afin de pouvoir prendre en compte les éléments suivants :

       

      • Dans quel pays puis-je divorcer ?
      • Si je peux divorcer en Angleterre et en France, quels sont les avantages et les inconvénients de divorcer dans un pays plutôt que dans l'autre ?
      • Ma décision judiciaire sera-t-elle reconnue et exécutée dans l'autre juridiction ?

       

      En outre, il y aura d'autres facteurs importants à prendre en considération, tels que les différences entre les procédures respectives, l'existence d'accords nuptiaux ou de contrats de mariage à prendre en compte, les coûts et la durée probables de chaque procédure dans chaque pays. Comme indiqué précédemment, il est important de demander conseil dès le début de la procédure afin de pouvoir faire les choix qui vous conviennent.

  • Les tribunaux anglais et français adoptent-ils la même approche lors du partage des biens ?
    • Non, c'est très différent.

      En France, l'acte même du mariage crée un régime de biens. Les couples doivent choisir un régime matrimonial de biens pour régir leurs biens et, s'ils ne le font pas, un régime par défaut leur sera imposé. Le régime de biens choisi est consigné dans un contrat de mariage français qui est généralement préparé et signé devant un notaire qui agit pour les deux parties. Ces régimes de biens permettent de structurer l'organisation et la répartition des biens du couple. Ils définissent la manière dont les biens doivent être traités en cas de divorce, ainsi qu'en cas d'insolvabilité ou de décès. Les couples savent donc comment leurs biens seront traités en cas de divorce en France, et ce dès la date de leur mariage.

      En revanche, l'Angleterre applique un système discrétionnaire. Un juge doit prendre en compte toutes les circonstances de l'affaire et la première considération est le bien-être des enfants de la famille âgés de moins de 18 ans. L'objectif global du juge est de parvenir à un résultat équitable. L'équité est déterminée par trois principes connus sous le nom de "besoins, partage et compensation". Bien qu'un couple puisse avoir conclu un accord nuptial (que nous abordons ci-dessous), celui-ci n'est souvent pas contraignant et ne dicte pas l'issue du divorce.

      Ainsi, en Angleterre, il n'y a pas deux cas identiques et l'issue dépendra beaucoup des faits particuliers de chaque cas.

  • Les accords nuptiaux anglais sont-ils similaires aux contrats de mariage français ?
    • Le contenu d'un contrat de mariage français tend à être très différent de celui d'un accord nuptial anglais qui est adapté aux exigences spécifiques des parties et peut traiter de questions telles que la division du capital et le paiement d'une pension alimentaire. Un contrat matrimonial français ne peut traiter que de la première question (division du capital).

      En outre, en Angleterre, les contrats matrimoniaux étrangers et les accords nuptiaux anglais ne sont pas légalement exécutoires ou automatiquement contraignants. Toutefois, la Cour suprême a formulé un test en trois parties dans l'affaire historique de Radmacher et Granatino, comme suit :

      "La Cour doit donner effet à un accord nuptial librement conclu par chaque partie avec une pleine appréciation de ses implications, à moins que, dans les circonstances qui prévalent, il ne soit pas équitable d’obliger les parties à respecter leur accord."

      En pratique, cela signifie que tout couple concluant un accord nuptial en Angleterre doit respecter les directives suivantes :

      • S’assurer qu'il n'y a pas de contrainte, de pression déraisonnable ou de déséquilibre important dans le pouvoir de négociation ;
      • S'assurer que chaque partie dispose de toutes les informations importantes pour sa décision de signer l'accord. La présence d'une divulgation financière et d'un conseil juridique indépendant tend à prouver que cet objectif a été atteint, mais n'est pas toujours nécessaire ;
      • S’assurer que l'accord est équitable.  Le concept d'équité comporte de nombreux aspects différents mais, en résumé, l'accord ne doit pas laisser l'une des parties dans une situation de besoin réel alors que l'autre jouit d'un niveau suffisant ou plus.

       

      Plus important encore, il n'est pas possible d'évincer la juridiction de la Cour anglaise, qui conserve son pouvoir discrétionnaire de confirmer ou de rejeter un accord nuptial. Toutefois, si ces garanties sont respectées, le couple doit s'attendre à être tenu de respecter les termes de son accord.

  • L'Angleterre reconnaîtra-t-elle et maintiendra-t-elle un contrat matrimonial français ?
    • Non, pas automatiquement. Comme indiqué précédemment, il n'est pas possible d'évincer la juridiction de la Cour.

      Dans le passé, les tribunaux anglais ont été prudents quant au poids qu'ils sont prêts à accorder aux contrats de mariage étrangers en général et pas seulement à ceux qui sont français. La raison en est que ces accords ont tendance à être beaucoup moins formels que les accords prénuptiaux anglais. La plupart des couples les concluent dans les jours qui précèdent le mariage, sans prendre de conseils juridiques indépendants et souvent sans les voir divulgués. 

      Cependant, l'affaire récente Versteegh v Versteegh [2018] a facilité la confirmation des contrats matrimoniaux étrangers en Angleterre, car la Cour reconnaît que ces informalités sont courantes. En d'autres termes, si les normes procédurales qui s'appliquent au pays dans lequel l'accord est rédigé sont respectées, on peut soutenir que l'accord devrait être confirmé, c'est-à-dire que l'absence de formalité ne signifie pas automatiquement que l'une ou l'autre des parties a mal compris les implications de l'accord. Cela dit, il est toujours important que les personnes souhaitant s'appuyer sur un accord matrimonial étranger démontrent que les deux parties ont pleinement compris les implications de la conclusion de l'accord et que chacune d'entre elles disposait de toutes les informations nécessaires à sa décision. Dans ces circonstances, le tribunal est susceptible de donner effet à l'accord, à moins que cela n'entraîne une injustice.

      En fin de compte, chaque cas dépendra des faits qui lui sont propres et il n'y a donc aucune garantie qu'un simple contrat matrimonial français sera appliqué en Angleterre comme il le serait en France dans le cadre d'un divorce. Il est également important de noter que le tribunal anglais appliquera toujours le droit anglais et non le droit français pour le partage du capital et le paiement de la pension alimentaire.

  • Que se passe-t-il si mon partenaire veut rester vivre en Angleterre mais que je veux retourner en France avec les enfants ?
    • En partant du principe que les deux parents ont la responsabilité parentale des enfants, il ne sera possible pour vous et les enfants de déménager en France pour y vivre que si l'autre parent y consent par écrit. Si l'autre parent n'y consent pas, vous devrez demander une ordonnance au tribunal anglais pour obtenir la permission de déménager avec votre enfant.  Si vous ne le faites pas, tout déplacement hors de la juridiction sera considéré comme un enlèvement d'enfant.

      Ce type de demande est souvent très stressant pour les deux parents. L'un des parents peut craindre que la distance créée par le fait de vivre dans deux pays différents entraîne une diminution des contacts avec son enfant et, par défaut, une relation moins significative. L'autre parent peut craindre d'être contraint de continuer à vivre dans un pays où il ne veut plus être. Il est donc très important de demander conseil et d'examiner attentivement si un tel déménagement serait réellement dans l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant et, dans l'affirmative, de pouvoir démontrer et prouver ces avantages. Il faut également veiller à démontrer que vous serez en mesure de soutenir et de faciliter une relation significative entre le parent qui continue à vivre en Angleterre et l'enfant. Il est donc essentiel de demander conseil dès le début si vous envisagez un tel déménagement.

Back to Family